Country: Rwanda

TradeMark Africa Receives $63 Million from Netherlands to Advance Sustainable Trade and Economic Inclusivity

Nairobi, 8 February: The Government of the Netherlands, through its Ministry of Foreign Affairs, in a significant boost to global trade development, has announced a $63 million funding to TradeMark Africa, a leading aid-for-trade organisation. This strategic investment will fuel TradeMark Africa's Strategy 3, covering the period till 2030, aimed at driving green, sustainable economic growth, fostering innovative trade practices, and promoting inclusive trade across Africa. This move underscores the Netherlands' commitment to enhancing economic opportunities, job creation and facilitating sustainable trade throughout the continent. Marchel Gerrmann, Ambassador for Business and Development Cooperation at Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs, said: “TradeMark Africa will significantly contribute to a more inclusive and prosperous trade landscape for the African continent, benefitting both African and Dutch businesses." The Netherlands’ contribution will be invested in strengthening trade systems so that they benefit local exporters, foster economic growth, and create sustainable livelihoods across diverse sectors. This investment will be instrumental in improving market access for local products at the global level, in addition to bolstering initiatives that drive innovation, research, and development within the African market, enhancing competitiveness and green trading practices. As part of its Africa Strategy, the Netherlands contributes towards the implementation of the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA). The AfCFTA is expected to boost intra-African trade over 30% by 2045 and is projected to provide an average extra 2.7% GDP boost across the continent. The AfCFTA could lift 30 million Africans out of poverty by 2035, offering market opportunities to both African...

The East African Community Non-Tariff Barriers Factbook and Toolkit

Understanding non-tariff barriers in the East African Community Non-Tariff Barriers (NTBs) play a significant role in increasing the cost and time of trade or doing business or simply impede trade between or amongst partner states. The East African Community (EAC) Elimination of Non-Tariff Barriers Act 2017 refers to NTBs as laws, regulations, administrative and technical requirements other than tariffs imposed by a Partner State, whose effect is to impede trade. Many of the regulations and technical requirements that affect trade – rising from Non-Tariff Measures (NTMs) – serve legitimate policy objectives to safeguard public health or the environment.  The EAC Elimination of Non-Tariff Barriers Regulations, 2017 highlights that one aspect of what makes an NTM an NTB is whether a “measure is discriminatory and restricts trade directly or indirectly. This factbook and toolkit provides an overview of the various categories of NTBs, why NTBs are harmful and how to identify, report and monitoring the resolution of NTBs in EAC context.

Compliance to Standards Boosts Rwanda’s Tourism Industry

Rwanda Standards Board (RSB) and TradeMark Africa (TMA)’s decade-long partnership to ensure standards and conformity assessment services are at the heart of fast-tracking trade have yielded tremendous results. Aside from reduced time required to purchase Rwanda’s standards from 5.2 days before 2021 to 4.1 hours after automating RSB’s systems, the interventions positioned 20 agrifood enterprises in the country to comply with ISO 22000 Food Management System (FSMS)/RS 184 Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP), which are vital requirements for food safety. These certifications have been instrumental in the successful implementation of the Rwanda National Meetings, Incentives, Conferences/Conventions and Events/Exhibitions (MICE) Tourism Strategy. Local consultants, enterprise trainees, 60 youthful graduates and RSB auditors underwent capacity building on FSMS, HACCP and related Pre-requisite Programmes (PRPs). These efforts ensure that Rwanda is complying with international standard requirements for bodies providing management systems certification, thereby enhancing producer firms’ credibility and confidence in their activities, processes, products, services. This in turn ensures competitiveness at the local and international markets. Visitors to Rwanda can now enjoy safe, seamless and world class experiences at the country’s hospitality establishments. Rwanda Development Board (RDB)’s 2022 Annual Report showed that the country’s MICE industry continued an impressive growth streak and generated a total of $64.4 million from hosting 104 events attended by more than 35,000 delegates. For more insights, read the Rwanda Standards Journal with an exclusive focus on the partnership between Rwanda Standards Board and TradeMark Africa in advancing standardisation and conformity assessment in Rwanda. [download id="66923"]